What Can I Do with a Degree in Anthropology?

Career Options

Students who graduate with a Bachelors Degree in Anthropology go on to attend graduate programs in a variety of areas, such as: anthropology, archaeology, other social sciences, law school, medical school, and more or pursue careers in the following fields:

  • Archaeology (preservation, cultural resource management and research)

  • Behavioral science (teaching, human services, administration, community relations, program development, research, human resources, case management, counselor, etc.)

  • Bilingual education (teaching, program and community development, advocacy, politics, planning, etc.)

  • Business (Management, marketing, personnel (Human Resources), diversity training, cultural brokerage, international business, etc.)

  • Community organization (program and community development, advocacy, politics, education, planning, etc.)

  • Consulting (counseling, case management, developmental programming and education, public policy, etc.)

  • Data Analyst (Statistical, geographic data or laboratory analyst, etc.)

  • Environmental impact assessment (advocacy/intervention, counseling, case management,programming, education, public policy, etc.)

  • Ethnic, cultural, environmental, women’s and various nonprofit organizations (administration and planning, evaluation, policy, advocacy, etc.)

  • Government (Federal/state/local/tribal in the cultural or environmental resource management, policy, research or working in parks or historic sites, etc.)

  • Fund-raising (administration and planning, writer, education, assistant, accounting, etc.)

  • Journalism and publishing (communications specialization, scientific and creative writing, news casting, freelance work, etc.)

  • Law (administration and planning, case management, program evaluation, policy setting, politics, education, planning, etc.)

  • Linguistics, translation and interpretation (Federal/state/local/tribal administration and planning, case management, program evaluation, policy setting, politics, education, planning, etc.)

  • Media (marketing, film making (documentary, photography, freelance work, etc.)

  • Medical and health-related jobs (International/Federal/state/local/tribal medical work, such as the world health organization (WHO), doctor, nurse, laboratory technician, genetics counselor, disease outbreak control, therapy, etc.)

  • Museums, libraries, archives and art galleries (administration and planning, restoration, critic, curator, education, assistant, accountant, etc.)

  • Peace Corps and humanitarian aid (counseling, education, wellness promotion, employee assistance, organizational development, human resources, labor unions, health maintenance organizations, etc.)

  • International diplomacy (administration and planning, case management, program evaluation, policy setting, politics, education, planning, etc.)

  • Police work and forensics (Criminal Investigative Services (CIS), medical examining, artist, etc.)

  • Public relations and administration (administration and planning, case management, program evaluation, policy setting, etc.)

  • Refugee and immigrant services or foreign service and aid agency (counseling, education, wellness promotion, employee assistance, organizational development, human resources, labor unions, health maintenance organizations, etc.)

  • Rural, urban, national and international development agencies (administration and planning, case management, program evaluation, policy setting, etc.)

  • Scholarship and research (social and environmental science research, etc.)

So, what can I do with a degree in Anthropology?

A degree in anthropology can lead to a wide variety of careers. In today's world, anthropologists staff leading medical, business and law schools, and play critical roles in international ventures, public health programs, community development activities and migrant social actions. That’s great, but how can your degree land you in one of those careers? Most job applications will not require or even ask for a "degree in Anthropology” so the key to getting a job in any of those careers is learning how to effectively communicate the skills you have developed to employers.

So what are those skills? Well, the skills and qualities USU’s anthropology students and alumni gain from the program are being in-depth thinkers, with effective reading and writing skills; the ability to solve problems across the humanities and natural sciences; and have a fundamental understanding of the cultural diversity in the modern global world.

How can you improve your chances at getting the anthropology career you want? The first step is to know what your interests are. For example, do you like being in a lab, out in the field or in a classroom? Most non-teaching jobs in anthropology are in the areas of: archaeology, applied anthropology, public anthropology, environmental anthropology, and medical anthropology. Some anthropology graduates use their degree (Bachelors or Masters) in Anthropology to get jobs in anthropology and related fields. But, those holding a degree or degrees in Anthropology bring important skills to a large number of fields - education, health care, museums, social work, international development, government, organizational psychology, non-profit management, marketing, publishing, business and forensics – just to name a few. So, think about what interests you. Talk to our faculty about your interests and how a degree in Anthropology will help you get to where you want to go.

Second, long before graduation - beginning your Sophomore year
- you should begin to build your resume with important items. Talk with faculty about participating in field schools (ethnographic and archaeological), research, and about opportunities to present at conferences and publish. The more experience you have the better.

The Anthropology Program houses a diverse faculty who engage students in a variety of research through leading edge labs and real-world field experiences that go beyond the basics of classroom instruction. While studying Anthropology at Utah State University, undergraduate students gain knowledge in both the liberal arts and natural sciences. Class sizes are generally small, which enables students to receive extensive individualized attention. The program is designed to give students a full range of experience, allowing undergraduates gain skills and expertise usually available to graduate
students.

The graduate program offers a Master of Science Degree in
Archaeology Cultural Resource Management—an applied program designed to meet the standards of the Register of Professional Archaeologists, and will become project directors and principal investigators. Cultural Resource Management archaeology provides industry and government agencies with an evaluation of heritage resources that by law have to be taken into account prior to the alteration of our public landscapes; and is now an institutionalized element of the environmental management industry in the United States and many other countries. Archaeologists help industry and agencies find ways to protect what is of value by avoidance and occasionally by mitigation, and they facilitate land management. The minimum degree requirement for the permits and the professional registry is a master’s degree.

Average Starting Salary for Social Science Degree

Average Starting Salary for Anthropology Degree